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What can Concord do to honor its history and culture?

Zoning regulations and setbacks from rivers and ponds are there for a purpose. It's always disappointing to see builders applying for exceptions, particularly for their projects near rivers and within... Read more...

9 supporters

Concord has allowed developers to have their way with the town. Unlike other towns in the Western suburbs, Concord has been slow to build protective regulations and reluctant to enforce the rules it makes.... Read more...

10 supporters

Yes, all the affordable ranch houses are being replaced by almost identical looking mini-McMansions that are 3-6 times the square footage. As a result affordable housing is disappearing and our carbon... Read more...

9 supporters

John Boynton, a CRLP committee member presented a response to the committee referencing my comment - you can find that response here: http://concordma.gov/DocumentCenter/View/12706. It concerns me that... Read more...

2 supporters

Thank you India H, for including Mr. Boynton,s response. The home-replacements projects he gives for examples seem to serve the opposite of diversity. The original seller of a ranch wins, the buyer (eg.,... Read more...

6 supporters

It is not necessarily true that the original seller wins either. There is no need to assume that an average family or starter couple (or even a middle aged empty nester couple) would not pay good market... Read more...

5 supporters

In fact, in Conantum, a family sold to what they assumed was another family. It turned out to by a proxy buy which was then flipped into a McMansion. It was heartbreaking to the family who had participated... Read more...

7 supporters

Here's a thought: you are selling your home...it is 60 years old and in a nice neighborhood, close to town. You get multiple offers...what do you do? Chose the highest and best offer or pick one that... Read more...

I also live on Elsinore Street (14 years as a renter, outbid on an offer I placed about three years ago on a home), and am seeing the change take place in this neighborhood as several houses over the past... Read more...

4 supporters

Jessica - I don't agree that these 60 year old ranch houses are fuel suckers. I worked as an engineer in the energy industry for many years and most (if now all these houses) were insulated and retrofitted... Read more...

6 supporters

India-I live in a 60+ year old drafty home that has blown in insulation and the fuel comsumption is more than the 4,000 sf newly-built home behind me. Not all homes were insulated and retrofitted.

I agree with the statement that older homes are not necessarily 'fuel suckers', since in most cases one can improve home efficiency greatly (taking advantage of rebates from either MassSave or the Town... Read more...

4 supporters

Yes smaller homes and even older homes can be better insulated especially over the ceilings on the top floors. This is where most lf the heat escapes. Hear friezes so the ceiling on your top floor is most... Read more...

Jessica, all, this is a great discussion. I just want to reiterate, though, that my initial comment was that Mr. Boynton's implication that only developers will pay the best price, and that the larger... Read more...

1 supporter

Hi Tanya,

As a Realtor and someone who lives in a transitional neighborhood, I can tell you that the developers were the highest offers on the Capes in my neighborhood. Now, the Capes have become... Read more...

1 supporter

Hi Jessica. *Nowhere* did I say or have said that "developers are the bad guys." Nor did I say they should not make money on their investment. The subject is
questionable statements in *Mr. Boynton's... Read more...

1 supporter